Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel

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Lower auto repair and gas costs, and find deals on flights and hotels by timing your trip right.

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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 2 of 11

Drive Gently

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Think about it this way: Your brakes turn money into heat.

No, we’re not telling you not to stop. But, if you find yourself braking hard frequently, you’re probably not looking down the road far enough to anticipate what’s coming, or you’re trying to drive faster than traffic’s going to let you. Chill out and coast your way to savings.

And, of course, speed costs. For every mile an hour over 55 you travel on the highway, your fuel economy goes down by 2%.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 3 of 11

Run on Regular

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Even if you have an engine that's designed to run on premium fuel, you can probably fill up with regular most of the time. You may lose a little power, but nearly every car on the road today is equipped with a knock sensor to eliminate pinging. If you don't hear pinging, you can use regular fuel — and enjoy savings of about 20 cents for each gallon.

*The exception: Is your car turbo- or supercharged? Stick with the manufacturer’s recommended fuel grade.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 4 of 11

Keep that Clunker

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Based on total ownership costs over five years -- including insurance, fuel, repairs and depreciation -- the results are firmly in favor of hanging on to your old car.

Remember, the biggest new-vehicle expense is depreciation. When you put tags on your new baby, its value starts to tumble — often faster than you’re paying it off on the loan.

Think your ride is going to last? See if it’s one of our 10 Cars that Refuse to Die
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 5 of 11

Lighten Your Load

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Car engineers spend countless hours trying to shave five pounds off a car, and you’re leaving your golf clubs in there? Please, your car is not a closet. Clean it out.

An extra 100 pounds in your trunk can lower your gas mileage by 2%, and luggage on a roof rack can decrease your gas mileage by 5%, according to the Federal Trade Commission.


If you can take your roof rack’s crossbars off when you’re not using them, do that, too.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 6 of 11

Don't Drive

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Yes, we know, it’s easier said than done. But transit systems’ Web sites have come a long way in explaining when and where their buses and trains run and can help you plan a route that will let you sit instead of drive.

Even if the transit option takes more time, remember that when you’re not driving you can stay in touch with the office by phone or hand-held device safely.

Or, see if you can telecommute. .

You’ll save wear and tear on your car — and your psyche.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 7 of 11

Don't Skimp on Maintenance

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Air is free — or close to it. But not having enough in your tires will cost you gas andpossibly endanger your safety.

You can improve your gas mileage by up to 3.3 % just by keeping your tires inflated to the proper pressure (look for the PSI values in your owner’s manual or on the door jamb — not on the tire).

And if the “check engine” light comes on — particularly if it’s blinking — remember that a car that has an emissions problem is likely also wasting gasoline.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 8 of 11

Travel Off-Peak

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Dreaming of a trip to Hawaii? Consider hitting the islands earlier in the year, during the off-peak season. According to Kayak.com in late December, airfares from Washington, D.C., to Honolulu start at $879 round-trip for flights in mid July, but drop to as low as $719 round-trip for early-March trips. And because we’re talking Hawaii, the weather will be just as gorgeous.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 9 of 11

Fly on Tuesday

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Flying during the week instead of on weekends, when most people travel, is a great way to save. For example, going from New York City to San Francisco on a Friday in mid May and returning the following Friday will cost $388 a ticket. A Tuesday-to-Tuesday round-trip would cost just $338 a person.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 10 of 11

Procrastination Pays

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Last-minute deals that offer great bargains on unfilled plane seats and hotel rooms are regularly posted on many travel Web sites, including AerLingusVacationStore.com.

In early January, for example, two people heading from New York to Dublin could get a package with two plane tickets and four nights at the three-star Regency Hotel for $1,449 if they booked by mid January for an April trip. But if the couple could take off before late February, the cost would drop to $1,189.
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Save $50 a Day, 2011: Transportation and Travel | Slide 11 of 11

More from Kiplinger

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Save $50 a Day on Investing & Financial Planning

Save $50 a Day on Shopping & Entertainment

Save $50 a Day on Food and Medicine

Save $50 a Day on Utilities and Home Improvement
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